BPA

  1. [BREAKING] This ‘everywhere’ chemical is even MORE poisonous than we thought

    I just LOVE the old crime flicks -- especially the ones where they’re trying to commit the “perfect” murder.

    Spoiler alert: They NEVER pull it off!

    Of course, real life ain’t the movies. Out here, they’re KILLING folks all the time… leaving ZERO trace… and NOT getting caught.

    Could YOU be their next victim?

    I know I sound like a conspiracy kook.

    But y’know the old saying…

    Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean they’re NOT out to get ya!

    And the latest research exposes one of the most untraceable forms of mass killing you can imagine.

    It’s a chemical hiding in your food and drink right now – one MILLIONS of Americans are unknowingly ingesting daily.

    And the new study shows how it’s slowly… quietly… secretly… and PERFECTLY… killing some of us!

    But I’ve cracked the case. I’ve solved the crime… and I’ve found the culprit.

    More importantly, I’ve got a PROVEN way to protect you from this mass poisoning!

    The secret ingredient… with deadly consequences

    If you know anything at all about BPA, it’s all the “BPA FREE!” labels on packaging and such now.

    But don’t feel TOO reassured by that.

    This dangerous, hormone-disrupting chemical is still in a whole lotta stuff – everything from canned foods to drink bottles to store receipts and more.

    Heck, it’s probably in your dental fillings and sealants, too.

    You’re basically getting micro-dosed at every turn, a sloooooow poisoning over many years.

    And the new study… which tracked folks for a decade… finds that the MORE exposure you have

    The HIGHER your risk of an early exit from this world.

    Folks with the highest levels of all… the top 25% in terms of exposure… were 49% more likely to be to be pushing up daisies, compared to those with the lowest exposure.

    This isn’t death by BPA. Not directly.

    BPA is more of a middle man. It SCREWS with your hormones… and can JACK UP your risk of deadly chronic disease…

    And that, in turn, can HASTEN your transformation into worm food.

    As far as your doctor is concerned, you died of diabetes… or a heart problem… or maybe cancer… or any of the OTHER diseases and conditions that BPA has been linked to over the years…

    Not the BPA itself.

    That’s how they get away with it.

    But it’s time to put a stop to this crime-in-progress.

    One study a few years back found that a few simple changes in your home can cut the BPA levels in your body by 60%... within just 3 days!

    Switch your food and drink from plastics to glass and stainless steel… and cook in ceramics instead of microwave-safe containers (not that you should be using a microwave anyway, but that’s another story).

    While you’re at it, avoid canned and frozen foods, as both are common sources of BPA.

    You can’t get your exposure to ZERO. It’s just in too many things right now.

    And those “BPA-free” products you see just replaced BPA with BPS… which frankly doesn't appear to be any better.

    But you certainly CAN bring your exposure down to levels that won’t kill you.

    In Your Corner,

    Dr. Allan Spreen

    P.S. Think your organics are safe? There could be a dangerous additive hiding in there! Click here to find out what it is… and what the risks are.

  2. Study links BPA to obesity in kids

    Is this common chemical making your kids fat?

    When does incompetence cross the line into negligence?

    You don't need to look any further than the FDA's handling of the bisphenol (BPA) crisis for the answer to that question. They hurtled across that line at top speed years ago.

    Make no mistake...BPA, a synthetic chemical found in consumer products ranging from aluminum cans to cash register receipts, is a threat to your health. This is a fact with a stack of research backing it up. Yet, the FDA refuses to acknowledge the danger.

    Sure, after years of pressure they finally caved this year and banned the chemical from children's sippy cups and baby bottles. Too bad it was an empty gesture.

    The truth is parents had wised up long ago, and were buying BPA-free products for their babies long before the ban. Since there wasn't a market for the BPA-tainted baby bottles and sippy cups anymore, most manufacturers had already stopped making them anyway.

    And besides, despite its own ban the FDA still refuses to acknowledge that BPA actually poses a threat to health. In fact, they're so confident that it isn't a threat that they decided not to ban the creepy chemical in aluminum cans and other food packaging. Talk about a muddled message.

    The devil is in the details

    The problem with BPA is that it's a low-grade estrogen...or estrogen-mimic. Your body simply can't tell the difference between it and the "real stuff." And since you're being exposed to bits of BPA all the time, all those little bits can add up to a big problem.

    Studies have shown it can wreak havoc with your metabolism and endocrine system.
    In fact, research has already revealed an association between BPA and infertility, sexual dysfunction, cancer, heart disease, adult obesity, and neurological disorders. And studies linking the chemical to certain markers of sexual maturity have raised concerns about it playing a role in girls reaching puberty so much earlier these days.

    (Not a threat?! Come on, are you even paying attention here FDA?!?)

    Now a frightening new study has found a link between BPA and obesity in children and teens. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, used a sample of nearly 3,000 kids and teens between the ages of 6 and 19.

    After reviewing the children's BPA levels the researchers found that the kids with the highest levels of urinary BPA were 2.6 times more likely to be obese than those with the lowest levels. Caucasian kids had it worst, being five times more likely to be obese when they had high BPA levels. But African-American kids still had an elevated risk, and were 1.25 times more likely to be obese when their BPA levels were elevated.

    And with kids being exposed to BPA since before they're even born these days, it's easy to see why these findings are so concerning.

    BPA is bad news

    Now no one is suggesting that BPA is the sole cause of obesity. As I've explained before, obesity is a complex problem with no single cause. Diet (poor ones) and exercise (lack of it) of course, both, have starring roles to play in the epidemic.

    But, despite huge efforts to get people moving more and eating less, our weight... and our children's weight... continues to balloon. And frankly, with all the evidence that's stacked up we'd be foolish to ignore the role that environmental factors like BPA are playing in the problem.

    When you look at the long and growing list of health concerns associated with this chemical two things are clear. The first is that B-P-A spells B-A-D news for your health, and the health of your family. And the second is that the FDA has been asleep on the job when it comes to protecting us from it.

    The FDA maintains that "the very low levels of human exposure to BPA through the diet" are safe. But the reality is that the average person's exposure levels are nowhere near "very low," and they certainly aren't limited to diet.

    Heck, one study last year found that eating a serving of canned soup for just five days in a row can send your BPA levels skyrocketing by 1000%! And BPA is found in all kinds of other non-food related products including flooring, pipes, nail polish, compact discs, electrical appliances, and more.

    The truth is, unless you move to a remote island somewhere avoiding BPA altogether is nearly impossible. But you can reduce your family's exposure by making a commitment to buying fresh foods more often. And when you must use something processed be sure to look for a BPA-free stamp on the can or package before buying it.

  3. More problems with BPA exposure

    Remember a few weeks ago I warned you that 40 percent of store receipts contain residue of BPA or bisphenol-A? It‘s a type of plastic commonly used make plastic food and beverage containers. The problem is, BPA leaches into your food and drinks and can disrupt your entire endocrine system. The FDA has told you time and again that moderate exposure to BPA isn‘t harmful to your health. But a new major study proves otherwise. Scientists from the UK recruited 715 healthy adults to examine the effects of BPA on hormone production. They collected samples of their urine and measured the amount of BPA excreted daily. The scientists found that men and women were exposed -- on average -- to a little over 5 micrograms of BPA per day. (Scientists estimate that in the U.S. men and women on average are exposed to slightly less than 5 micrograms of BPA per day.) The scientists also discovered that the higher the BPA exposure, the greater the hormone disruption. In men, they found higher levels of testosterone. Previous studies have also proven that BPA mimics the action of estrogen in the body. These two disruptions together spell big problems for men and women. As you‘ll recall, last year scientists found that men exposed to high levels of BPA experienced significant erectile dysfunction. And for women, too much estrogen circulating in the blood is a major risk factor for breast cancer.

    Small exposure spells big problems

    According to the study‘s lead author, David Melzer, "This is the first big study of BPA from a European country and confirms that ‘routine‘ exposures in the population are not negligible." So even if you don‘t work in a plastic factory, there are significant risks to limited BPA exposure day in and day out. As I‘ve urged before, throw out any plastic that‘s got a #7 on it. You know it contains BPA. Plus -- it‘s wise to avoid all canned foods, as these are likely to contain BPA as well. Plastics products imprinted with #1, #2 and #4 on the bottom are safer choices and do not contain BPA. To solve the problem altogether, skip the plastic and store food in glass or ceramic containers. That‘s what we used in the good ‘ole days, anyway.
  4. BPA exposure may cause even more serious health problems

    Remember a few weeks ago I warned you that 40 percent of store receipts contain residue of BPA or bisphenol-A? It‘s a type of plastic commonly used make plastic food and beverage containers. The problem is, BPA leaches into your food and drinks and can disrupt your entire endocrine system. The FDA has told you time and again that moderate exposure to BPA isn‘t harmful to your health. But a new major study proves otherwise. Scientists from the UK recruited 715 healthy adults to examine the effects of BPA on hormone production. They collected samples of their urine and measured the amount of BPA excreted daily. The scientists found that men and women were exposed -- on average -- to a little over 5 micrograms of BPA per day. (Scientists estimate that in the U.S. men and women on average are exposed to slightly less than 5 micrograms of BPA per day.) The scientists also discovered that the higher the BPA exposure, the greater the hormone disruption. In men, they found higher levels of testosterone. Previous studies have also proven that BPA mimics the action of estrogen in the body. These two disruptions together spell big problems for men and women. As you‘ll recall, last year scientists found that men exposed to high levels of BPA experienced significant erectile dysfunction. And for women, too much estrogen circulating in the blood is a major risk factor for breast cancer.

    Small exposure spells big problems

    According to the study‘s lead author, David Melzer, "This is the first big study of BPA from a European country and confirms that ‘routine‘ exposures in the population are not negligible." So even if you don‘t work in a plastic factory, there are significant risks to limited BPA exposure day in and day out. As I‘ve urged before, throw out any plastic that‘s got a #7 on it. You know it contains BPA. Plus -- it‘s wise to avoid all canned foods, as these are likely to contain BPA as well. Plastics products imprinted with #1, #2 and #4 on the bottom are safer choices and do not contain BPA. To solve the problem altogether, skip the plastic and store food in glass or ceramic containers. That‘s what we used in the good ‘ole days, anyway.
  5. BPA Plastics Update:More reasons to throw out your cans and buy (or grow) fresh!

    I warned you last October about using canned foods and clear plastic food containers as they might contain a form of plastic called Bisphenol-a (or BPA). Even though the FDA and the EPA said last year that BPA poses no threat to human health, I have my doubts. Plus -- a few new twists and turns in this story have me more frustrated than ever, so I wanted to give you an update. First off... Here's the problem with BPA: It leaches into your food and gets absorbed by the body. In fact, drinking from a polycarbonate water bottle for just one week can prove harmful. That's according to a new study out last month by the Harvard School of Public Health. Harvard scientists invited 77 students to participate in this groundbreaking study, the first to emphasis just how quickly the body begins to absorb BPA from food or beverage containers. The students began the study with a 7-day wash-out period. During that time, they only drank from stainless steel containers in order to minimize BPA exposure. The BPA in their urine was then measured and used as a baseline. On the 8th day, students began drinking from clear polycarbonate water bottles that were known to contain BPA. The students drank from the containers for just one week. (Polycarbonate bottles are clear, hard, non-breakable, and refillable. They usually have a pop-top or flip-top lid for drinking.) Any guesses how much the BPA spiked after just one week? The BPA found in the students' urine after just one week of drinking from the plastic containers spiked by 69 percent! And in case you were wondering -- the students did use the water bottles properly. They didn't heat them. They didn't put them in the microwave. They didn't put them in the dishwasher. Nor did they use them with hot liquids, as these are all known to increase leaching. But the BPA leached anyway! And what's most shocking to me is how quickly the spike occurred. In just one week, their urine was full of the stuff. So why do we worry when we see spikes in BPA? Well, according to the Harvard School of Public Health news release, BPA is an "endocrine-disruptor in animals, including early onset of sexual maturation, altered development and tissue organization of the mammary gland and decreased sperm production in offspring. It may be most harmful in the stages of early development." That's not good, especially when you consider many baby bottles still contain BPA. (You can find some BPA-free baby items in stores now. Look on the packaging to be sure.) Plus -- high BPA levels in the body are associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, neurological problems, and even cancer. In fact, one study by scientists from the University of Cincinnati showed that even low levels of BPA in the body can interfere with chemotherapy by essentially "protecting" the cancer cells. Big brother starting to take action… The good news is, lawmakers are starting to step in to put BPA food containers where they belong: off the market. Last week -- following the lead of Canada, the city of Chicago, and Suffolk County, NY -- the California state senate passed a bill to ban the use of BPA in baby bottles and sippy cups. And it looks like dozens of other states plan to follow suit...despite the FDA's 2008 ruling. In fact, it looks like the FDA's BPA ruling had less to do with actual scientific proof and more to do with dollar bills...5 million of them to be exact. Let me explain... Conflicts of interest from start to finish First off, the FDA ruling on BPA in 2008 was based on just two studies. And those were funded by the American Plastics Council. Clearly, they have a stake in keeping the status quo. And if that weren't enough of a conflict of interest… Martin Philbert is the founder and co-director of the University of Michigan Risk Science Center. Sounds benign enough, right? Well, he's also the Chairman of the FDA panel that put out the 2008 report on BPA telling us it was safe. But good old Marty has some explaining to do. Last year, reporters discovered that Philbert's Risk Science Center received a $5 million donation (that's 50 times the organization's annual budget) from a very dubious source. The donation came from Charles Gelman, an activist who, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal "has fought against government regulation of pollutants for years." He's also gone on record saying he believes BPA does not pose a threat to public health. It should come as no surprise that Gelman's hefty donation was sent to the Risk Science Center just before Philbert was set to rule on BPA safety in 2008. Even more interesting is that Philbert never disclosed the large donation to the FDA. It only came to light after reporters asked about it. But not to worry...an FDA associate commissioner looked into it. Since Philbert's salary wasn't paid by the $5 million donation, he's certain there wasn't a conflict of interest. Riiight. Well, after some urging last week by two U.S. senators, it looks like the new FDA chief Margaret Hamburg, M.D. might actually have to fess up to the gaffe and reconsider last year's BPA ruling. Turns out that the ruling may have been made a bit hastily. I'd say! In any case, folks, if you're still unsure whether your plastic containers contain BPA, look for a recycling number somewhere on the bottom of the item. If it's got a #7 on it, you know it's got BPA in it. Plus -- it's wise to avoid all canned foods as these are likely to contain BPA as well. Go for fresh, organic string beans, peaches, and corn this summer, instead of the canned variety. I'm sure your local farmer's market has opened for the season, so it's a perfect time to clear out that pantry of all your canned foods. Or get really serious and plant your own beans this year!

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