If you're anemic, a new study should interest you. Scientists found that taking spirulina for anemia could help.

Spirulina is a form of blue-green algae found in fresh and salt water. You can also take it as a tablet. It's rich in omega-3 fatty acids as well as essential minerals, like iron and potassium.

For this study, scientists recruited 40 seniors with anemia to take 3,000 mg of spirulina for 12 weeks. According to Nutra-Ingredients USA, "The objective was to determine if the supplements could be effective in countering two conditions that frequently impact the health of older people: anemia and declining immune function."

After 12 weeks, scientists ran CBCs (complete blood counts) on the volunteers.

First off, the volunteers had higher white blood cell counts. These cells are your front-line defense against viruses, bacteria, and toxins.

The volunteers also had more haemoglobin in their red blood cells. (Low corpuscular haemoglobin -- on the other hand -- means you're anemic.) Researchers also noted that older women responded particularly well to taking spirulina for anemia.

Plus, this isn't the first time scientists used spirulina to improve anemia. A previous study showed that malnourished children and children with HIV who took spirulina improved their anemia and gained weight.

As you'll recall from last week, you need to be careful when choosing your sources of iron. That's because inorganic forms -- like those found in most multivitamins -- can increase free radical formation. But organic iron doesn't.

That's why spirulina is the perfect choice for your extra iron. Most of spirulina tablets sold on the market contain organic iron. Just check the label to be sure.